Legislative Matters

Jan Margosian and Cindy Condon host this information-packed and discussion of Oregon State Legislators’ crafting laws and regulations to meet and fulfill Oregon citizens’ needs. Legislative Matters will be an ongoing special report from February through June 2021.


Resources for Easy Reference

Resources for Easy Reference

Click on the Hyperlinks for more information

How a Bill Becomes Law

https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/citizen_engagement/Pages/How-an-Idea-Becomes-Law.aspx

Legiscan provides information about all the bills introduced and their movement, or lack thereof, through the legislative process.https://legiscan.com/OR

Scheduled Legislative Hearings and Work Sessions

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/Committees/Meeting/List

2021 Bills of Willamette Valley Legislators

(click on the hyperlinks for detailed information about the bills)

The following information provides a quick look at what Willamette Valley legislators are thinking about as they enter the 2021 Oregon Legislative Session. Bills will come and go, but the bills they put their name on now tell us a little bit about their policy priorities. Click on the https:// links below to see the bills sponsored by each legislator with a short description. You can follow links to dig deeper into the bills.

Representative Shelly Boshart Davis
Republican – District 15 – Albany, Millersburg, Tangent
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1415


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-389, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]


Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/boshartdavis

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Boshart-Davis

Representative Dan Rayfield
Democrat – District 16 – Corvallis
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1416 District Phone: 541-740-7744


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-275, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/rayfield

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Rayfield

Representative – Jami Cate
Republican  – District 17 – Lebanon
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1417


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-378, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]


Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/cate

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Cate

Representative Rick Lewis
Republican – District 18 – Silverton
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1418


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-484, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/lewis

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Lewis

Representative Raquel Moore-Green
Republican  – District 19 – Salem
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1419


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-385, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/moore-green

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Moore-Green

Representative Paul Evans
Democrat – District 20 – Monmouth
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1420


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE,  H-471, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]  


Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/evans

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Evans

Representative Brian L. Clem
Democrat – District 21 – Salem
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1421


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-481, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/Clem

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Clem

Representative Teresa Alonso León
Democrat – District 22 – Woodburn
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1422


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-272, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/alonsoleon

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Alonso-Leon

Representative Mike Nearman
Republican – District 23 – Independence
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1423


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-381, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/nearman

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Nearman

Representative Ronald H. Noble
Republican – District 24 – McMinnville
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1424

Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-380, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/noble

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Noble

Representative Bill Post
Republican – District 25 – Keizer
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1425


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, H-479, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/post

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Post

Senator Sara Gelser
Democrat – District 8 – Corvallis, Albany, Philomath, Millersburg, Tangent, and unincorporated parts of Linn and Benton County
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1708


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, S-405, Salem, Oregon 97301

Email: [email protected]  


Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/Gelser

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Gelser

Senator Fred Girod
Republican – District 9 – Stayton
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1709 


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, S-323, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/girod

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Girod

Senator Deb Patterson
Democrat   – District 10 – Salem
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1710 


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, S-215, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/patterson  

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Patterson

Senate President Peter Courtney
Democrat – District 11 – Salem
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1600 


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, S-201, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/courtney

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Courtney

Senator Brian Boquist
Party: Independent 
District: 12
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1712

Capitol Address: 900 Court St NE, S-311, Salem, OR, 97301


Email: [email protected]

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/boquist

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Boquist

Senator Kim Thatcher
Republican – District 13 – Keizer
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1713


Capitol Address: 900 Court St. NE, S-307, Salem, Oregon 97301


Email: [email protected]   

Website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/Thatcher

https://legiscan.com/gaits/search?state=OR&keyword=Thatcher


Legislative Matters February 1, 2021

Legislative Matters February 1, 2021

Resources for Easy Reference

Click on the Hyperlinks for more information

How a Bill Becomes Law

Graphic Source: https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/citizen_engagement/Pages/How-an-Idea-Becomes-Law.aspx

Upcoming Scheduled Legislative Hearings and Work Sessions

(by Committee)

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/Committees/Meeting/List

LEGISLATIVE MATTERS

FEBRUARY 1, 2021

Following are links to some of the material covered in the February 1, 2021 Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part program. The focus of the program was Education and Healthcare. Clicking on the links will take you to the Education and Healthcare Committees main page. From there you can click on the date of the hearing for a complete A/V recording of the hearing. To access Meeting Materials, including testimony and staff reports, remember to click on the Meeting Materials Tab. Unfortunately, Recording Logs of the hearings are not yet available, but hopefully will be soon.

Also a correction from January 25 program: Senator Brian Boquist is now an INDEPENDENT representing District 12 – Rural Yamhill, Polk, and Benton counties, including McMinnville and Dallas and areas south and west of Corvallis. We identified him as a Republican. In January he changed his registration from Republican to Independent. We regret the error.

Education Committees Meetings: Please go the meeting materials tab for testimony. Also, for more information on all hearings of the committee, click on the meeting date on right side of the page to view information related to hearings on another date.

Senate Education Committee – January 25, 2021; January 27, 2021, January 29, 2021

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/SED/2021-01-25-15-15/Agenda

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/SED/2021-01-27-15-15/Agenda

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/SED/2021-01-29-15-30/Agenda

House Committee on Education:

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/HED/2021-01-28-13-00/Agenda

Finance and Revenue:

A balanced state budget must be achieved by the end of session and there is a very large gap between revenue and expenses – expected expenses far exceed revenue. No surprise here due to the decline in 2020 revenue and increased expenses due to COVID response, wildfire catastrophe, economic decline, and a variety of other issues.

In December the Legislative Fiscal Office released a report projecting a near ~$800 million dollar gap between revenue and expenses. See the link below. This gap appears to have widened since December to ~$1.5 billion. This gap will be a shadow over the current legislative session. In the end, the Oregon state budget for the next biennium must be balanced by the end of session.

2021-23 General Fund/Lottery Funds Tentative Budget

For more information on what the House is grappling with, please go to the House Committee on Revenue:

Of particular interest is a very detailed report of Oregon revenue and expenditures. It might be more information than you ever wanted to know, but it is fascinating.

 

Basic Facts 2021 RR 1-21

   

Specific Bills mentioned or discussed in the program:

House Committee on Education: Click on the Bill Number link for more details on the bill.

    • HB 2090 (1:05 pm) Establishes timeline for petition to make changes in boundary of community college district. Represents a change in process to proposed boundary change petitions.

    • HB 2472 (1:20 pm) Designates Oregon Institute of Technology as Oregon’s Polytechnic University. Representative Reardon questioned why the change was important: It is a marketing issue!

In Healthcare action:

  • The Senate on Healthcare met last week taking invited testimony only. Testimony was heard regarding COVID response, Vaccine Distribution, Health Care Affordability, and Public Health Modernization.

People given testimony on Health Care Affordability were:

Jeremy Vandehey, Director, Health Policy and Analytics, Oregon Health Authority
Jesse O’Brien, Senior Policy Advisor, Department of Consumer and Business Services
Numi Lee Griffith, Program Coordinator, Drug Price Transparency Program, Department
of Consumer and Business Services
Maribeth Guarino, Health Care Advocate, Oregon State Public Interest Research Group
(OSPIRG)
Joan Morgan, Happy Valley
Andrea Meyer, Director of Government Relations, AARP Oregon
Additional presenters TBD

Those giving testimony on Public Health Modernization

Cara Biddlecom, Deputy Public Health Director, Oregon Health Authority
Rebecca Tiel, Chair, Public Health Advisory Board (PHAB)

On January 26 the House Committee on Healthcare heard testimony on the legislative priorities for the Department of Consumer and Business Services and on January 28 held an information meeting to hear from subject matter experts on the following:

Informational Meeting

  • (3:15 pm) Health Equity in Oregon
    Linda Roman, Health Policy Advisor, Office of Governor Brown
    Leann Johnson, Director, Division of Equity and Inclusion, Oregon Health Authority
    Kate Wells, Director, Wellness and Community Health Strategy, PacificSource Solutions

  • (3:45 pm) History of Oregon’s Health System Transformation
    Bruce Goldberg, Professor, Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University,
    School of Public Health
    Jeremy Vandehey, Director, Health Policy and Analytics, Oregon Health Authority

  • (4:25 pm) Provider Perspectives on Need for Health System Transformation
    Sean Kolmer, Senior Vice President of Policy and Strategy, Oregon Association of Hospitals and
    Health Systems
    Gil Munoz, Chief Executive Officer, Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center
    Courtney Johnson, Government Relations Director, Trillium Community Health Plan
    Stefan Shearer, Public Policy and Regulatory Affairs Specialist, CareOregon

Please click on the following links for full access to Healthcare Committee hearings, work sessions and meeting materials including visual presentations and testimony.

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/SHC/Overview

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/HHC/Overview

House work sessions last week included the following bills:

Work Session

  • HB 2114 Authorizes Oregon Board of Psychology to assess costs associated with disciplinary action to person against whom disciplinary action is taken.

  • HB 2115 Authorizes Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists to sanction applicants for licensure and licensees for unprofessional conduct.

  • HB 2116 Authorizes Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists to order mental health, medical condition or chemical dependency evaluations of applicants, licensees and registered interns.

  • HB 2117 Repeals Oregon Board of Psychology authority to issue initial psychologist associate licenses.

  • HB 2381 Modifies laws relating to youth suicide intervention and prevention to include children under 10 years of age.

  • HB 2417 Requires Department of Human Services to administer program to provide matching grants to cities or counties to operate mobile crisis intervention teams.

  • HB 2469 Requires state medical assistance program to provide for up to six behavioral health checkups every year.

  • HB 2493 Directs Health Licensing Office to establish and maintain voluntary alternative practitioner registry of individuals who provide alternative well-being care.

  • HB 2585 Imposes requirements upon mental health treatment professionals and programs to ensure culturally and linguistically affirmative mental health services for individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind or hard of hearing.

A public hearing was held to hear testimony on:

  • HB 2078 (4:30 pm) Repeals electronic credentialing information program.


Legislative Matters February 8, 2021

Legislative Matters February 8, 2021

LEGISLATIVE MATTERS

FEBRUARY 8, 2021

Following are links to some of the material covered in the February 8, 2021 Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part program. The areas in focus this week are Energy, Environment, Natural Resources, Redistricting and Conduct. Clicking on the specific committee links (colored text) below will take you to the web page for the chosen committee which have been assigned bills in these subject matter areas.

  • From the landing page, you can click on the date of the session to see the meeting agenda. If the meeting is in session, you can watch live video of the committee at work.

  • If you click on a bill number in an agenda, you will land on an overview page for the specific bill. Click on the tabs for submitted meeting material, including written testimony, read the text of the bill as introduced and/or amended.

  • If the meeting has already finished, you can click on the video icon for a complete A/V recording of the hearing and/or work session.

  • Again, to access important Meeting Materials, including testimony and staff reports, remember to click on the Meeting Materials Tab at the top of the overview page.

  • Unfortunately, Recording Logs of the hearings are not yet available, but hopefully will be soon.

Committees covered in the program were the House Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources, Senate Committee On Natural Resources and Wildfire Recovery, Senate Committee on Energy and Environment, House Committee On Energy and Environment, Senate Committee on Redistricting, House Committee on Redistricting, Senate Committee on Conduct and House Committee on Conduct. Please go to the meeting materials tab for testimony and staff reports, including background information on bills. Also, for more information on all hearings of the committee, click on the meeting date on right side of the page to view information related to past and future hearings/work sessions.

Some of the more interesting Hearings and Bills mentioned in the program:

Some of the more interesting bills in these committees are:

HB 2067

Overview

At the request of:

(at the request of Governor Kate Brown for State Department of Fish and Wildlife)

Chief Sponsors:

 

Regular Sponsors:

Introduced and printed pursuant to House Rule 12.00. Presession filed

Bill Title:

Relating to authorizations issued by the State Fish and Wildlife Commission.

Catchline/Summary:

Allows State Fish and Wildlife Commission to charge fees for hunting, angling and shellfish licenses, tags and permits that are less than amount established in statutory fee schedule. Eliminates one-day angling license. Reduces maximum current and future one-day angling and shellfish license fee established in fee schedule. Deletes provision for partial dedication of one-day angling license fee for fish restoration and enhancement programs. Deletes provision for temporary partial dedication of one-day angling license fee to Oregon Hatchery Research Center Fund. Provides for temporary partial dedication of one-day angling and shellfish license fee.

HB 2229

Overview

At the request of:

 

Chief Sponsors:

Representative Wilde Democrat – District 11 – Central Lane and Linn Counties

Regular Sponsors:

(Presession filed.)

Bill Title:

Relating to state preemption.

Catchline/Summary:

Exempts from state preemption Josephine County measure that banned production or cultivation of genetically modified crops.

HB 2258

Overview

At the request of:

 

Chief Sponsors:

Representative Owens (R-Crane)

House District 60 (Baker, Grant, Harney, Malheur, & part of Lake Counties)

Regular Sponsors:

(Presession filed.)

Bill Title:

Relating to foods.

Catchline/Summary:

Allows farm or ranch owner or operator to sell ownership interest in all or part of livestock to final consumer. Makes slaughtering facility regulations inapplicable to farm or ranch owner or operator slaughtering livestock if meat is for noncommercial use of holder of ownership interest in livestock. Allows retail food establishment to sell producer-processed agricultural products. Allows restaurants and other facilities selling ready-to-eat food to sell food containing producer-processed products not requiring time or temperature control to prevent safety hazards. Sets maximum annual production and sales for farm-direct marketer. Changes sales limit for bottler, packager or canner of certain fruit-based items sold by farm-direct marketer. Authorizes farm-direct sales of producer-processed products. Authorizes agricultural producer consignment sales of producer-processed products not requiring time or temperature control to prevent safety hazards.

HB 2357

At the request of:

 

Chief Sponsors:

Rep. Salinas Democrat – District 38 – Lake Oswego; Rep. Holvey Democrat – District 08 – Eugene; Senator Golden Democrat – District 3 – Ashland

Regular Sponsors:

Representative – Khanh Pham Democrat  – District 46 – Portland; Representative Wilde Democrat – District 11 – Central Lane and Linn Counties

Bill Title:

Relating to forest management.

Catchline/Summary:

Eliminates Oregon Forest Resources Institute and Oregon Forest Resources Institute Fund. Establishes Sound Forestry Practices Subaccount as subaccount of State Forestry Department Account. Requires that revenue from levy of additional privilege tax under forest products harvest tax be credited to State Forestry Department Account for deposit in Sound Forestry Practices Subaccount. Directs State Forestry Department to use moneys in Sound Forestry Practices Subaccount to develop and apply sound forestry practices in collaboration with other state agencies. .

Chapter Number:

 

HB 2379

Overview

At the request of:

 

Chief Sponsors:

Representative Holvey

Regular Sponsors:

(Presession filed.)

Bill Title:

Relating to forestry; prescribing an effective date; providing for revenue raising that requires approval by a three-fifths majority.

Catchline/Summary:

Imposes severance tax on owner of timber at time of harvest at five percent of value of timber. Directs revenue from severance tax to be transferred to Emergency Wildfire Fund. Repeals forest products harvest taxes and funds certain associated expenditures with severance tax revenues. Abolishes Emergency Fire Cost Committee. Abolishes Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund. Takes effect on 91st day following adjournment sine die.

SB 109

Overview

Bill Title:

Relating to use of unmanned aircraft systems in state parks.

Catchline/Summary:

Directs State Parks and Recreation Commission to adopt rules managing use of unmanned aircraft systems by people in state parks.

SB 125

Overview

Bill Title:

Relating to the establishment of a publicly owned state research forest; prescribing an effective date.

Catchline/Summary:

Requires Department of State Lands to study and make recommendations to interim committee of Legislative Assembly regarding establishment of publicly owned state research forest. Sunsets January 2, 2023. Takes effect on 91st day following adjournment sine die.

SB 287

Overview

Bill Title:

Relating to wildfire; declaring an emergency.

Catchline/Summary:

Requires that electric companies and consumer-owned utilities have wildfire plans based on best practices. Allows insurance policy encouragement of wildfire risk reduction. Requires comprehensive statewide map of wildfire risk. Requires establishment of minimum defensible space requirements. Provides for funding local facilitation of requirements. Appropriates moneys to State Fire Marshal to provide funding. Requires annual report to Legislative Assembly. Creates advisory committee. Requires report to interim legislative committee by February 1, 2022, regarding means to implement recommendations of Governor’s Council on Wildfire Response. Requires program generating wildfire smoke level information. Authorizes information program regarding wildfire smoke health risks. Provides for clean air shelters. Requires increased availability of filtration systems. Requires Office of Emergency Management to include wildfire in statewide emergency plan and coordinate with cities, counties and certain facilities. Creates Task Force on Wildfire Education Coordination. Requires report to interim committee by September 15, 2022. Sunsets December 31, 2022. Requires regional analysis of wildfire risks and possible reduction. Establishes priorities for forestland and rangeland restoration. Requires analysis of wildfire risk mitigation and response capacity. Requires cooperation with federal agencies regarding wildfire. Provides for forestland and rangeland fuel load treatment on public and private lands. Creates reduced assessment rate for small tract forestland undergoing forest health improvement. Establishes goals for forest resiliency. Requires adoption of rules for funding wildfire response. Requires that all areas have baseline level fire protection. Requires actions to increase wildfire response capacity. Declares emergency, effective on passage.

SB 453

Overview

Bill Title:

Relating to low forest fuel load levels on state forestland; prescribing an effective date.

Catchline/Summary:

Requires State Forester to actively manage state forestlands to achieve and maintain low forest fuel load levels. Takes effect on 91st day following adjournment sine die.

SB 592

Overview

Bill Title:

Relating to lead contamination.

Catchline/Summary:

Prohibits person from using lead weight in waters of this state for purpose of angling or commercial fishing. Provides that violation is punishable by maximum of 364 days’ imprisonment, $6,250 fine, or both. Prohibits person from using lead shotgun pellet for purpose of hunting. Provides that violation is punishable by maximum of 364 days’ imprisonment, $6,250 fine, or both.

And some committee hearings coming up:

Senate Committee On Energy and Environment

 

2/11/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited testimony only

    • Resource Adequacy
      Megan Decker, Chair, Oregon Public Utility Commission
      Frank Afranji, President, Northwest Power Pool
      Maury Galbraith, Executive Director, Western Interstate Energy Board
      Jordan White, Vice President of Strategic Engagement & Deputy General Counsel, Western
      Electricity Coordinating Council

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 318 Requires Public Utility Commission to establish resource adequacy requirement applicable to all load serving entities.

2/16/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 14 Establishes product stewardship program for plastic packaging and plastic food serviceware.

    • SB 581 Prohibits sale of products that make deceptive or misleading claims about recyclability.

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 582 Directs Department of Environmental Quality to study and make recommendations for modernizing Oregon’s recycling system and provide results of study in report to interim committees of Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.

A review of previous committee action:

Senate Committee On Redistricting

1/25/2021 3:15 PM, Remote C

  • Organizational Meeting

    • (3:20 pm) Adoption of Committee Rules
      (3:25 pm) Introduction of Committee Members

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited testimony only

    • (3:40 pm) Introduction to Redistricting
      Wendy Underhill, Director, Elections and Redistricting, National Conference of State
      Legislatures (NCSL)
      Ben Williams, Policy Specialist, Elections and Redistricting, NCSL

1/27/2021 3:15 PM, Remote C

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited testimony only

    • Legal Requirements for Redistricting
      Dan Gilbert, Senior Deputy, Office of Legislative Counsel

    • History of Redistricting in Oregon
      Norman R. Williams, Director, Center for Constitutional Government, Willamette University
      College of Law

2/1/2021 3:15 PM, Remote C

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited testimony only

    • The Voting Rights Act and Preventing Discrimination During Redistricting
      Justin Levitt, Professor of Law, Loyola Law School

2/3/2021 3:15 PM, Remote C

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited testimony only

    • 2020 Census and Data Delivery Delays
      Kathleen M. Styles, Chief, Decennial Communications and Stakeholder Relationships,
      U.S. Bureau of the Census

    • Oregon’s Population and the Uses of Census Data
      Charles Rynerson, Oregon State Data Center Coordinator, Population Research Center,
      Portland State University

2/8/2021 3:15 PM, Remote C

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited testimony only

    • Census Data Delays and Potential Legal Remedies
      Dan Gilbert, Senior Deputy, Office of Legislative Counsel
      Marisa James, Senior Deputy, Office of Legislative Counsel

    • Unless otherwise noted on the agenda, testimony is only accepted by committees for bills or topics scheduled for a public hearing. See the Oregon Legislature’s website for information on contacting individual legislators directly on bills or topics not scheduled for a public hearing.

  • Potential Alternative Data Sources for Redistricting
    Kevin Rancik, GIS Analyst, Legislative Policy and Research Office

House Subcommittee On COVID-19

2/8/2021 3:15 PM, Remote 170

  • Public Hearing

    • (3:15 pm) Vaccine hesitancy, availability and accessibility for Oregonians who
      identify as Black, Indigenous and people of color

      Please share your stories about what is working, what isn’t working and let us know how we can do better.

      To submit written testimony on this topic, email to [email protected] To register to provide remote oral testimony, follow the instructions on “Oral Testimony” at the bottom of this agenda.

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited Testimony Only
      (3:35) COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution & BIPOC Communities
      Jill Ginsberg, MD MPH, Medical Director, North by Northeast Community Health
      Center
      Kelly Gonzales, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, OHSU-PSU School of Public Health

      (4:05) COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution & Local Health Authorities
      Jessica Guernsey, Multnomah County Public Health Director
      Joe Fiumara, Umatilla County Public Health Administrator
      Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer/ Administrator

2/9/2021 3:15 PM, Remote F

  • Informational Meeting

    • (3:15 pm) Mergers and Acquisitions in Health Care
      Rep. Andrea Salinas, House District 38
      Sen. Deb Patterson, Senate District 10
      Dr. Martin Gaynor, Carnegie Mellon University
      Dr. John McConnell, Center for Health Systems Effectiveness, Oregon Health & Science
      University
      Bill Kramer, Independent Expert

  • Public Hearing

    • HB 2362 (3:45 pm) Requires health care entities to obtain approval from Oregon Health Authority before any mergers, acquisitions or affiliations of entities that had $25 million or more in net patient revenue in preceding three fiscal years or before mergers, acquisitions or affiliations that will result in one entity having increase in net patient revenue of $1 million or more.

2/11/2021 3:15 PM, Remote F

  • Public Hearing

    • HB 2081 (3:15 pm) Modifies Health Care Cost Growth Target Program and Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee.

    • HB 3108 (3:45 pm) Requires individual and group health insurance policies, health care service contractors, multiple employer welfare arrangements and state medical assistance program to provide reimbursement for at least three primary care visits annually.

    • HB 2541 (4:15 pm) Provides that licensed optometrist may perform specified ophthalmic surgery procedures.

  • Possible Work Session

House Committee On Energy and Environment

2/8/2021 1:00 PM, Remote D

  • Informational Meeting

    • Invited testimony only

    • (1:05 pm) Function and Funding of Intervenors
      Michael Grant, Executive Director, Public Utility Commission
      Bob Jenks, Executive Director, Oregon Citizens’ Utility Board

    • (1:25 pm) Recycling
      Abby Boudouris, Legislative Analyst, Department of Environmental Quality
      Celeste Meiffren-Swango, State Director, Environment Oregon
      Timm Schimke, Director of Solid Waste, Deschutes County
      Laura Lebrick, Community & Governmental Affairs Manager, Rogue Disposal and Recycling
      Dylan deThomas, Vice President of External Affairs, The Recycling Partnership
      Becky Voelkel, Bottle Bill Program Manager, Oregon Liquor Control Commission

  • Public Hearing

    • HB 2062 (2:25 pm) Establishes energy efficiency standards for certain appliances sold or offered for sale in this state.

  • Possible Work Session

    • Possible Introduction of Committee Measures

Work done by the House Committee on Conduct was discussed at length in the program. To watch or listen to some fascinating committee hearings, please go to:

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/HCOND/Overview

Click on the meeting date and video link to watch.

Also a correction from January 25 program: Senator Brian Boquist is now an INDEPENDENT representing District 12 – Rural Yamhill, Polk, and Benton counties, including McMinnville and Dallas and areas south and west of Corvallis. We identified him as a Republican. In January he changed his registration from Republican to Independent. We regret the error.

Join us on every Monday at 8:00 am for another edition of Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part, a segment of Willamette Wake Up or listen any time streaming at KMUZ.org


Legislative Matters February 15, 2021

Legislative Matters February 15, 2021

LEGISLATIVE MATTERS

FEBRUARY 15, 2021

As you likely know, much of the Willamette Valley was hit with freezing weather and faced one of the worst power outages people can remember. Without access to the internet, a virtual legislative session just doesn’t work very well. Quite honestly, an in-the-flesh session probably would not have worked well either given the difficulty in getting to the Capitol. It was more difficult to access information for this program without access to our two critical resources, Oregon Legislative Information System and LegiScan. But we did! Unfortunately, some legislative committee hearings will be rescheduled because all legislative business Monday and Tuesday were cancelled due to the bad weather.

The inclement weather and power outages remind us of how important energy is for our daily lives. We are dependent on energy for how we live. Not having power makes one wonder if we have adequate energy resources to power Oregon’s future. It turns out legislators are asking that question, too.

The Senate Energy Committee held a hearing last week featuring testimony from the Public Utility Commission, Portland General Electric, the Northwest Public Power Council, Western Electricity Coordinating Council and others supporting Senate Bill 318 introduced by Senator Beyer, Chair of the committee. SB 318 would require the Public Utility Commission to establish resource adequacy requirements applicable to all load serving entities with some exceptions. The energy industry is changing dramatically with more renewable energy projects in development and retirement of legacy resources, like the PGE’s Boardman Coal Plant, and consideration of dam breaching on the Lower Snake River. Ensuring Oregon’s energy future is a necessary role for state government.

The House Conduct committee has been busy this session. Two representatives, Rep. Mike Nearman and Rep. Diego Hernandez, have been the focus of investigations this session. Jan commented on committee deliberations regarding Rep. Nearman in an earlier program and discussed the House Conduct Committee’s consideration of Rep. Hernandez last week.

Jan also mentioned House Concurrent Resolution 5, which may signal an important step in the consideration of policing when mental health issues are part of the situation. HCR 5 considers model home grown programs which have proved successful helping police departments and those with living with mental health challenges.

Another bill beginning the process is SB 736 which calls for establishment of a Taskforce on Restorative Justice. This bill appears to represent a fresh look at the intersection of education and juvenile justice. The bill includes the following:

(3) The task force shall make recommendations to achieve the following goals: (a) Reducing exclusionary discipline in schools;

(b) Reducing juvenile incarceration; and
(c) Reducing racial disparities in both education and juvenile justice.
(4) For the purpose of making the recommendations described in subsection (3) of this

section, the task force shall:
(a) Study restorative justice systems and requirements in other states, both in education and juvenile justice.
(b) Study restorative justice oversight in other states, both in education and juvenile justice.
(c) Consult with national experts on restorative justice and restorative practices, both in education and juvenile justice.
(d) Consult with researchers from the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission.
(e) Recommend statutory definitions for restorative justice for both the public education system and the juvenile justice system of this state.
(f) Recommend policies for implementing restorative justice in both the public education system and the juvenile justice system of this state.
(g) Recommend the scope, duties and membership of a permanent, independent restorative justice council to oversee restorative justice programs throughout this state, both in the public education system and the juvenile justice system.

(11) The task force shall submit a report in the manner provided by ORS 192.245, and may include recommendations for legislation, to the appropriate interim committees of the Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.

This bill is currently scheduled for a Senate Education Committee hearing on 2/17/2021 at 3:15 pm.

Following are links to some of the material covered in the February 15, 2021 Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part program. The areas in focus this week are Energy, Healthcare and Conduct. Clicking on the specific committee links (colored text) below will take you to the web page for the chosen committee and bills under consideration in these subject matter areas.

  • From the landing page, you can click on the date of the session to see the meeting agenda. If the meeting is in session, you can watch live video of the committee at work.
  • If you click on a bill number in an agenda, you will land on an overview page for the specific bill. Click on the tabs for submitted meeting material, including written testimony, read the text of the bill as introduced and/or amended.
  • If the meeting has already finished, you can click on the video icon for a complete A/V recording of the hearing and/or work session.
  • Again, to access important Meeting Materials, including testimony and staff reports, remember to click on the Meeting Materials Tab at the top of the overview page.
  • Unfortunately, Recording Logs of the hearings are not yet available, but hopefully will be soon.

Committees covered in the program were the Senate Committee on Education, Senate Committee on Energy and Environment, Senate Committee on Redistricting, House Committee on Redistricting, Senate Committee on Conduct and House Committee on Conduct. For more information on all hearings of the committee, click on the meeting date on right side of the page to view Bill and other information included in past and future hearings/work sessions. Please go to the meeting materials tab for testimony and staff reports, including background information on bills.

Some of the more interesting Bills being considered in the Senate are:

  • SB 14 Establishes product stewardship program for plastic packaging and plastic food serviceware.
  • SB 581 Prohibits sale of products that make deceptive or misleading claims about recyclability.
  • SB 582 Directs Department of Environmental Quality to study and make recommendations for modernizing Oregon’s recycling system and provide results of study in report to interim committees of Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.
  • SB 246 Modifies definition of radioactive waste for purposes of regulation by State Department of Energy.
  • SB 314 Authorizes Public Utility Commission to allow electric companies to recover costs from retail electricity consumers for prudent infrastructure measures to support transportation electrification if certain criteria are met.
  • SJR 12 Proposes amendment to Oregon Constitution establishing obligation of state to ensure every resident of state access to cost-effective, clinically appropriate and affordable health care.
  • SB 428 Extends for one year sunset on Task Force on Universal Health Care and extends deadline for task force to submit recommendations to Legislative Assembly.
  • SB 555 Requires Department of Human Services to contract with nonprofit organization to implement and administer program to assist recipients of supplemental nutrition assistance in purchasing locally grown fruits and vegetables from farmers’ markets, farm share sites and retail outlets that participate in program.
  • SB 45 Prohibits life insurance policies from excluding coverage for loss of life that results from terrorism.
  • SB 603 (8:05 am – 8:30 am) Directs Oregon Criminal Justice Commission to study establishment of Innocence Commission and system to compensate wrongfully convicted persons, and to provide results of study to interim committees of Legislative Assembly no later than December 31, 2021.
  • SB 42 Provides that members, officers and certain employees of State Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision qualify as police officers under Public Employees Retirement System.
    • SB 111 Modifies provisions relating to public employee retirement. SB 249 Allows county clerk to begin opening and counting mailed ballots upon receipt.
    • SB 250 Provides that county clerk shall establish regular business hours of at least 30 hours per work week for receipt and certification of instruments presented for recording.
    • SB 251 Revises statutes to make clear that county clerk or other filing officer is not required to provide secrecy envelope for ballot if Secretary of State has approved alternative procedure to ensure secrecy.
  • SB 434 Requires Oregon Health Authority to adopt rules governing facilities that provide community-based care to elderly individuals and individuals with disabilities to ensure planning by facilities and safeguards for occupants in event of natural disaster or pandemic.

And in the House:

  • HB 2070 (3:20 PM) Extends privilege taxes on merchantable forest products harvested on forestlands.
  • HB 2430 (3:20 PM) Extends privilege taxes on merchantable forest products harvested on forestlands.
  • HB 2389 (3:20 PM) Makes taxes levied upon taxpayers for privilege of harvesting merchantable forest products harvested on forestlands permanent.
  • HB 2379 (3:40 PM) Imposes severance tax on owner of timber at time of harvest at five percent of value of timber.
  • HB 2357 (4:20 PM) Eliminates Oregon Forest Resources Institute and Oregon Forest Resources Institute Fund.
  • HB 3037 (8:20 am) Directs medical examiner to report suspected suicides involving decedents 24 years of age or younger to local mental health authority.
  • HB 2381 (9:00 am) Modifies laws relating to youth suicide intervention and prevention to include children under 10 years of age.
  • HB 3046 (8:00 am) Specifies behavioral health treatment that must be provided by coordinated care organizations and covered by group health insurance and individual health plans and restricts utilization review criteria for behavioral health treatment.
  • HB 2469 (8:25 am) Requires state medical assistance program to provide for up to six behavioral health checkups every year.
  • HB 2585 (8:50 am) Imposes requirements upon mental health treatment professionals and programs to ensure culturally and linguistically affirmative mental health services for individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind or hard of hearing.
  • HB 2980 (9:15 am) Provides funding to peer-run organizations in Portland metropolitan area, southern Oregon region and eastern and central Oregon region to operate peer respite centers to provide peer respite services to individuals with mental illness who experience acute distress, anxiety or emotional pain.
  • HB 2946 (3:20 PM) Requires parties to franchise agreement to deal in good faith and commercially reasonable manner, and specifies required disclosures in franchise sale transaction.
  • HB 2757 (3:40 PM) Requires bidder for public improvement contract to demonstrate to contracting agency as part of responsibility determination that bidder provides health benefit plan or health insurance and retirement benefit plan to bidder’s employees, if public improvement contract or subcontract related to public improvement contract has contract price that exceeds $200,000.
  • HB 2719 (1:05 PM) Directs Department of Human Services to establish and administer program to provide moneys for third-party child care for child in foster home.
    • HB 2301 (8:05am) Directs State Treasurer to develop and implement small business support loan program that aids in supporting economic activities of small businesses during times in which small businesses cannot conduct business activities at ordinary or customary level because of statewide or regional emergency or other significant disruption of business activity.
  • HB 2001 (1:00 pm) Requires school district that is making reductions in educator staff positions to retain teacher with less seniority if teacher has more merit and if retention of teacher is necessary to maintain school district’s diversity ratio.
  • HB 2368 (1:30 pm) Establishes pilot program to improve educational outcomes by using trauma-informed approaches to education, health services and intervention strategies.
  • HB 2408 (2:00 pm) Directs Department of Education to conduct study on meeting students’ behavioral health needs and to report results of study to interim committee of Legislative Assembly related to education by September 1, 2021.
  • HB 2330 (2:30 pm) Makes permanent school district funding for foreign exchange students and small school district grants.
  • HB 2955 (1:05 pm) Establishes product stewardship program for household hazardous waste.
  • HB 3141 (1:20 pm) Reduces public purpose charge for retail electricity consumers within service areas of electric companies and Oregon Community Power.
  • HB 2495 (2:20 pm) Revises provisions relating to chemicals in children’s products.
  • HB 2648 (3:45 pm) Allows pharmacist or pharmacy technician to transfer drug containing pseudoephedrine without prescription to person who is at least 18 years of age and presents person’s valid government-issued photo identification.
  • HB 2080 (4:05 pm) Establishes Office of Pharmaceutical Purchasing in Oregon Health Authority and specifies duties.
  • HB 2623 (4:20 pm) Limits cost-sharing for health benefit plan coverage of insulin prescribed for treatment of diabetes.
  • HB 3033 (9:15 AM) Authorizes county with population of less than 15,000 to adopt property tax exemption for newly constructed single-family dwellings built and occupied as primary residences by individuals with annual taxable income of not more than $125,000 if filing separately or not more than $250,000 if filing jointly. HB 2583 (8:05 AM) Prohibits establishment or enforcement of occupancy limits on residential dwelling units by public bodies.
  • HB 2002 (1:05 pm) Converts mandatory minimum sentences for specified felonies other than murder to presumptive sentences.
  • HB 2937 (4:15 pm) Provides that student who experiences incident of harassment, discrimination or intimidation based on student’s race, color, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability or national origin, has cause of action against school district and perpetrator of incident.
  • HB 2513 (8:00 am) Requires police officers to be trained in airway and circulatory anatomy and physiology and certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
  • HB 2986 (8:15 am) Requires Board on Public Safety Standards and Training to ensure that police officers and certified reserve officers are trained to investigate, identify and report crimes motivated by prejudice based on perceived gender of victim.
  • HB 3164 (8:30 am) Modifies crime of interfering with a peace officer or parole and probation officer.
  • HB 2485 (1:05 pm) Requires state agencies to reduce public records request fees by 50 percent if request is made in the public interest, and requires state agencies to entirely waive fees if public records request is in public interest and narrowly tailored.
  • HB 2487 (1:35 pm) Modifies provisions relating to public records about public safety officers.
  • HB 2486 (2:05 pm) Requires, on or after October 1, 2021, officials of public bodies to grant news media representatives access to scenes of emergencies or emergency police activity that are otherwise closed to public.

 

Join us every Monday at 8:00 am for Willamette Wake-Up and another edition of Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part, or listen to the podcasts of this program and other Willamette Wake-Up great programs available at KMUZ.org. Thanks again for Tuning In and Taking Part.


Legislative Matters March 1, 2021

Legislative Matters March 1, 2021

LEGISLATIVE MATTERS

MARCH 1, 2021

Apologies for not posting after our February 22 program. Life got in the way. The Oregon Legislature is in full swing now with Committee Meetings, Hearings, Work Sessions and a Walkout, AGAIN. Yes, Republican senators and newly Independent Senator Brian Boquist did not show up for the Senate Floor Session on February 25 denying a quorum. Senate business could not be done. This is a pretty effective strategy for slowing down work, since 2nd and 3rd readings of bills and floor votes cannot occur without a quorum. (No floor votes were scheduled.) But, it does rile legislators wanting to work and many citizens who are relying on legislators to do their job of proposing, hearing, debating and voting on bills.

Moving on. Our March 1 program featured a discussion of the powerful legislative Rules Committees, the important work they do and a bit of Oregon history. We reviewed the February 23 House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee hearing regarding timber taxes and a collection of bills related to implementation of timber privilege or severance tax.

  • HB 2070 Extends privilege taxes on merchantable forest products harvested on forestlands.

  • HB 2430 Extends privilege taxes on merchantable forest products harvested on forestlands.

  • HB 2389 Makes taxes levied upon taxpayers for privilege of harvesting merchantable forest products harvested on forestlands permanent.

  • HB 2379 Imposes severance tax on owner of timber at time of harvest at five percent of value of timber.

And, on February 25, HB 2357 which would eliminate the Oregon Forest Resources Institute was heard.

Legislative committee hearings are held Monday through Thursday and many bills are being heard. It’s a race against the clock now. Most bills not scheduled for a Work Session by March 19 will be left for another session. Although some make be brought back to life by some legislative moves which can raise bills from the dead.

For upcoming hearings, we focused on the House and Senate Committees on Rules, Education, Energy and Natural Resources. To see a schedule of all committee hearings and the bills being heard, please go to Oregon Legislative Information System, https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/Committees/Meeting/List .

The Senate Committee on Rules met March 2 to consider nominations to many different commissions, councils, advisory committees, and boards. The state depends on volunteers to fill the seats for these bodies. If you are interested in doing public service, consider service on a state body. On March 9, the Senate Committee on Rules will hear testimony on some interesting bills related to elections, campaign finance and ranked choice voting:

3/9/2021 1:00 PM, Remote D

    • Instructions on how to submit written testimony and how to register to testify appear at the bottom of the agenda.

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 27 Requires that cover sheet of state, county, district and city initiatives list city and state of residence for chief petitioners, rather than residence address of chief petitioners.

    • SB 313 In addition to required county delegates, permits state central committee of political party to include as voting member any additional individuals designated by party.

    • SB 336 Prohibits candidates for state office from accepting contributions in excess of amounts specified and from sources not specified.

    • SB 343 Permits counties to adopt ranked-choice voting to conduct county elections.

Legislative committees on Education, Energy and the Judiciary are meeting this week on a variety of important bills. Some are:

In the Senate:

Energy and Environment

3/2/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 14 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 2-25-2021 MEETING: Establishes product stewardship program for plastic packaging and plastic food serviceware.

    • SB 581 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 2-25-2021 MEETING: Prohibits sale of products that make deceptive or misleading claims about recyclability.

    • SB 582 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 2-25-2021 MEETING: Directs Department of Environmental Quality to study and make recommendations for modernizing Oregon’s recycling system and provide results of study in report to interim committees of Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.

    • SJM 5 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 2-25-2021 MEETING: Urges Congress to enact bipartisan climate change legislation.

3/4/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

  • Work Session

    • SB 318 Requires Public Utility Commission to establish resource adequacy requirement applicable to all load serving entities.

Judiciary and Ballot Measure 110 Implementation

3/2/2021 8:00 AM, Remote A

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 398 Creates crime of intimidation by display of a noose.

    • SB 399 Provides that refusal to obey lawful order issued by peace officer or parole and probation officer does not constitute crime of interfering with a peace officer or parole and probation officer unless order is to move back and keep distance while officer is performing lawful duties.

    • SB 720 Directs Oregon Criminal Justice Commission to establish, in collaboration with Department of Corrections, Family Preservation Project pilot program at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility.

  • Work Session

    • SB 190 Modifies permissible methods of providing notice of appointment of guardian to protected person.

3/3/2021 8:00 AM, Remote A

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 206 Modifies procedures when court orders conditional release of person found guilty except for insanity.

    • SB 199 Modifies laws relating to form of advance directive.

    • SB 219 Requires Oregon Health Authority to establish and operate statewide registry for collection and dissemination of advance directives.

    • SB 499 Creates civil claim for wrongful conviction.

In the House:

Education

3/2/2021 1:00 PM, Remote E

  • Public Hearing

    • HB 2697 (1:05 pm) Requires education provider to prohibit use or display of any symbols of hate on school property or in education program.

Energy and Environment

3/1/2021 1:00 PM, Remote D

  • Public Hearing

    • HB 2062 (1:05 pm) Establishes energy efficiency standards for certain appliances sold or offered for sale in this state.

    • HB 2109 (1:50 pm) Modifies definition of “renewable energy facility” for purposes of county permitting process for certain energy facilities.

    • HB 2479 (2:05 pm) Modifies definition of “global warming” to include certain aerosol air contaminants, including black carbon.

    • HB 2398 (2:20 pm) Requires Director of Department of Consumer and Business Services to ensure that statewide Reach Code mandates achievement of not more than 90 percent of site energy use that other statewide residential and commercial building codes require.

3/3/2021 1:00 PM, Remote D

  • Work Session

    • HB 2165 (1:05 pm) Requires electric companies to collect amount from all retail electricity consumers, to be expended to support transportation electrification pursuant to plan accepted by Public Utility Commission.

    • HB 2180 (1:15 pm) Requires Director of Department of Consumer and Business Services to amend state building code to require that new construction of certain buildings include provisions for electrical service capacity for specified percentage of parking spaces.

    • HB 2395 (1:20 pm) Modifies definition of “recycled paper checkout bag” to include bags that contain nonwood renewable fiber for purposes of single-use checkout bag prohibition.

    • HB 2475 (1:25 pm) Authorizes Public Utility Commission to consider differential energy burden and other inequities of affordability in rates.

  • Public Hearing

    • HB 2674 (1:30 pm) Directs Department of Environmental Quality to study impacts of engine emissions on environment and provide results of study in report to interim committees of Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.

For more information go to KMUZ.org. Click on “Learn Why Legislative Matters” for more resources. 

Join us every Monday at 8:00 am for Willamette Wake-Up and another edition of Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part, or listen to the podcasts of this program and other Willamette Wake-Up great programs available at KMUZ.org. Thanks again for Tuning In and Taking Part.


Legislative Matters March 15, 2021

Legislative Matters March 15, 2021

LEGISLATIVE MATTERS

March 15, 2021

Combining 2 weeks in one post this time. Things are beginning to heat up in the legislature this week with more floor sessions. The House meets in floor session Mondays and Tuesdays, with the Senate meeting Wednesdays and Thursdays. Because floor sessions are in person meetings, there is an effort to have few people at the capitol, thus the different days for sessions. More bills are advancing through the first chamber hearings and floor votes and passing on to the second chamber for consideration. Thirty-one bills have passed through senate and moved to the house for consideration; six house bills have passed and moved on to the senate for consideration. For a complete list of bills and where they are in the process, go to LegiScan.com, an easy click from the KMUZ Legislative Matters Resource Page. To see the bills which have passed through one chamber, click on “Engrossed” at the top of the Active Oregon Bills.

We circled back to the Revenue Report which was delivered on February 24 to the House Committee on Revenue. We encourage you to read the report, but if time is an issue, just read the summary. The Revenue Report is so critical to legislative work. It takes money to deliver services to Oregonians and many of the bills introduced this session require money…and lots of it. Luckily, Oregon’s revenue picture looks quite good right now. Remarkable in the time of COVID, revenue is actually greater than predicted. The revenue uptick seems to be generated by higher reported incomes and infusion of federal funds. The revenue picture looks so good, Oregon’s unique “Kicker” Law, which provides if actual revenues exceed budget projections by more than 2%, taxpayers get a kickback of the excess. The March 2021 Revenue Forecast suggests ~$173 million might be kicked back to taxpayers…time will tell. It’s early yet and all the money has yet to be counted and the budget biennium doesn’t end until June 30, 2021.

Committees are in full swing in both chambers next week. On Tuesday, March 16, the Senate Rules Committee will hear testimony on Senate Bill 791 which would establish ranked-choice voting for all nonpartisan statewide and local government offices, and for winner of nomination by major political parties for federal and state political offices, beginning after January 1, 2023. Ranked Choice Voting which is gaining traction across the country. Benton County is currently the only jurisdiction in Oregon using ranked choice voting for local elections. Also, the Senate Rules Committee will have a Work Session on House Bill 2168 establishing Juneteenth as a legal state holiday.

This is HB3144 Establishes annual salary of members of Legislative Assembly at annual mean occupational employment and wage estimate for Oregon for year preceding start of biennium. Directs Legislative Revenue Officer to report annual mean occupational employment and wage estimate on or before May 1 of each odd-numbered year. Applies to salary pay periods beginning on or after January 1, 2022. The salaries could be raised from $32,800 to roughly $55,000. This bill was considered in a House Rules Committee hearing on March 2 and referred to the House Committee on Modernizing the People’s Legislature without recommendation.

Friday, March 19 is the deadline for scheduling work sessions on bills. If no work session is scheduled, most of the bills not scheduled will be left for another sessions. We are watching the work sessions closely to see the bills which have a chance of surviving and possibly passing this session.

Some senate bills scheduled for work sessions this week:

Senate
Energy and Environment

3/16/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

    • SB 847 Establishes Bottle Bill Expansion, Access and Transparency Task Force.

  • Possible Reconsideration and Work Session

    • SB 318 Requires Public Utility Commission to establish resource adequacy requirement applicable to all load serving entities.

3/18/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

  • Public Hearing

    • SCR 17 Establishes environmental justice framework of principles for State of Oregon.

    • SB 589 Requires State Department of Energy to establish public process for purpose of investigating potential costs and benefits that would arise from electric utilities participation in regional transmission organization.

Health Care

3/15/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

  • Work Session

    • SB 763 Provides that person may not engage in business as pharmaceutical representative without obtaining license from Director of Department of Consumer and Business Services.

    • SB 764 Provides that Attorney General and court must presume that resolution agreement that ends dispute over alleged infringement of patent or violation of other protection for protected drug has anticompetitive effects if alleged infringer receives item of value as part of or in connection with resolution agreement or if alleged infringer agrees to limit or stop researching, developing, manufacturing, marketing or selling competing drug.

    • SB 711 Requires Oregon Health Authority to study cost differences in pharmaceuticals used primarily by men and pharmaceuticals used primarily by women and report findings to Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.

    • SB 587 CARRIED OVER FROM 3/10/2021 AGENDA: Requires Department of Revenue to issue license to qualified retailers of tobacco products and inhalant delivery systems.

    • SB 2 Prohibits insurers from imposing prior authorization or other utilization review requirements on coverage of proton beam therapy that do not apply to coverage of radiation therapy.

    • SB 3 Requires health benefit plans to cover emergency medical services transports.

3/17/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

  • Work Session

    • SB 557 Establishes COFA Dental Program in Oregon Health Authority to provide dental care to low-income citizens of Pacific Islands in Compact of Free Association who reside in Oregon and lack access to affordable dental coverage.

    • SB 567 Includes as unlawful practice medical provider’s denial of treatment that is likely to benefit patient based on patient’s race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability.

    • SB 641 Prohibits denial of medical assistance on basis that individual under 19 years of age is in detention pending adjudication.

    • SB 706 Requires Oregon Health Authority to provide grant to organization for purpose of conducting outreach to citizens of island nations in Compact of Free Association residing in Oregon to enroll citizens of island nations in Compact of Free Association in medical assistance.

3/16/2021 8:00 AM, Remote A

  • Work Session

    • SB 575 Modifies procedure for expunction of certain juvenile records.

    • SB 204 Adds citizen review bodies designated by law enforcement agencies to definition of “criminal justice agency.” Allows citizen review bodies to access Law Enforcement Data System.

    • SB 621 Upholds, under certain circumstances, local laws concerning local community oversight board established to oversee disciplinary matters concerning law enforcement officers, notwithstanding collective bargaining laws that require bargaining over such matters.

3/17/2021 8:00 AM, Remote A

  • Work Session

    • SB 571 Allows persons convicted of felony to register to vote, update voter registration and vote in elections while incarcerated.

3/18/2021 8:00 AM, Remote A

  • Work Session

    • SB 566 Removes term “mentally defective” from statutes defining sexual offenses.

    • SB 298 Conforms language in provisions relating to stalking protective order to language used in other provisions relating to protective orders.

    • SB 483 Creates rebuttable presumption that person violated prohibition against retaliation or discrimination against employee or prospective employee if person takes certain action against employee or prospective employee within 60 days after employee or prospective employee has engaged in certain protected activities.

    • SB 704 Provides that discovery of victim’s actual or perceived gender, gender identity, gender expression or sexual orientation does not constitute reasonable explanation for extreme emotional disturbance for purposes of affirmative defense to murder in the second degree.

Labor and Business

3/16/2021 8:00 AM, Remote B

  • Work Session

    • SB 317 Allows holder of full on-premises sales license to make retail sales of mixed drinks in sealed containers for off-premises consumption.

    • SB 569 Makes unlawful employment practice for employer to require employee or prospective employee to possess or present valid driver’s license as condition of employment or continuation of employment.

Public Hearing and Possible Work Session

  • SB 425 Provides that Legislative Assembly finds and declares that telecommunicators are first responders.

  • SB 496 Removes prohibition on payment of unemployment insurance benefits to nonprofessional employees of educational institution providing school food services or services as employee of federal Head Start program for weeks of unemployment commencing during period between two successive academic years or terms.

3/18/2021 8:00 AM, Remote B

  • Work Session

    • SB 315 Exempts from required disclosure business, commercial, financial, operational and research data and information that is furnished, developed or generated in connection with ownership or operation of unmanned aerial system test range, if disclosure of information would cause competitive disadvantage to test range or users.

    • SB 111 Modifies provisions relating to public employee retirement.

    • SB 112 Provides that common law employees are employees for purposes of Public Employees Retirement System.

For more information go to KMUZ.org. Click on “Learn Why Legislative Matters” for more resources.

Join us every Monday at 8:00 am for Willamette Wake-Up and another edition of Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part, or listen to the podcasts of this program and other Willamette Wake-Up great programs available at KMUZ.org. Thanks again for Tuning In and Taking Part.

March 8, 2021

March is International Women’s History Month…or Herstory Month as the case may be. As Jan mentioned in the program, more women hold seats in the Oregon legislature than ever before and women hold most statewide offices, Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan, Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, and Labor Commissioner Val Hoyle. Women are taking their seats at the tables and raising their voices in the streets, in boardrooms and the halls of power. We salute the women of herstory whose shoulders we stand upon.

The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis delivered its revenue forecast at the February 24 meeting of the House Committee on Revenue. It was an interesting report with a good news opening paragraph and a bad news closing paragraph. Read the report. For anyone interested in the money flows to government, it is fascination, especially given the dire projections in the March 2020 Revenue Forecast. For a taste of the report, following are excerpts:

The opening paragraph

The economy is emerging from a dark winter. The resurgent virus of a few months ago is in full retreat. The outlook brightens with every inoculation. The stage is set for stronger economic growth this year and next than the U.S. has experienced in decades, probably generations. The combination of increased vaccinations, large and swift federal policy responses, and a more resilient underlying economony results in a cycle unlide anything experienced before.

…and the last paragraph:

Although the additional revenue called for in the March 2021 outlook is a welcome sight, budget writers still face a challenging environment this session. Although personal income taxes have continued to grow this biennium many other revenue sources such as lottery sales have not. While better than past recessions, overall revenue growth remains quite modest from an historical perspective. With both federal aid and asset booms expected to expire, revenue growth will remain modest during the 2021-23 budget period. Should this baseline outlook come to pass, state resources will have more remained roughly unchanged for three consecutive budgets. This growth’s not sufficient to keep up with rising need for, and the cost of, providing of public services.

The revised revenue forecast leaves many breathing a sigh of relief in the short term, some looking forward to a “Kicker”distribution which occurs when revenue exceeds budget by more than 2%. The current revenue forecast suggests a Kicker. Time will tell. Because a balanced budget is a must pass responsibility for the 89th Oregon Legislature, the revenue forecast looms large over any legislation with revenue and/or expense associated with it. For more information, go to Oregon Legislative Information System, House Committee on Revenue 2/24/2021, click on the Meeting Materials tab for the Revenue Forecast details.

The next revenue forecast comes on May 19. We’ll keep you posted.

Scheduled for 3rd Readings in the Senate are several bills focused on healthcare. SB39, SB40, SB98, SB99 are up for floor votes in the senate on Wednesday, March 10.

SB 39 literally redefines the practice of nursing with the following language:

(7)(a) “Practice of nursing” means autonomous and collaborative care of persons of all ages, families, groups and communities, sick and well, and in all settings to promote health and safety, including prevention and treatment of illness and management of changes throughout a person’s life.

Additionally, the bill speaks to the supervision by nurses of other nurses, removing one word “noninjectable” from the following paragraph:

SECTION 2. ORS 678.036 is amended to read:678.036. (1) A nurse who is responsible for supervising nursing assistants shall not be considered to be supervising a nursing assistant who administers [noninjectable] medication while the nurse is absent from the facility at which the administration occurs unless the nursing assistant is acting pursuant to specific instructions from the nurse or the nurse fails to leave instructions when the nurse should have done so.

SB40 would require nursing license applicants to have graduated from a program that includes a clinical component.

SB98 The Oregon Board of Medical Imaging (OBMI) licenses and regulates radiographers, radiation therapists, limited X-ray machine operators, nuclear medicine technologists, sonographers, MRI technologists, and Bone Densitometry. Currently, OMBI’s disciplinary response options are limited to refusing to issue or renew licenses or suspending or revoking licenses. Senate Bill 98 gives the Oregon Board of Medical Imaging additional disciplinary options and allows the Board to consider additional reasons a licensee or permittee may be unfit.

SB99 Allows Board of Medical Imaging designee to perform inspections related to medical imaging and X-Ray machines. Takes effect 91st day following adjournment sine die.

Eight other bills will be voted in the Senate on Wednesday. Go to OLIS to see if the bills are now headed to the House for further consideration.

For more information go to KMUZ.org. Click on “Learn Why Legislative Matters” for more resources.

Join us every Monday at 8:00 am for Willamette Wake-Up and another edition of Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part, or listen to the podcasts of this program and other Willamette Wake-Up great programs available at KMUZ.org. Thanks again for Tuning In and Taking Part.


Legislative Matters March 29, 2021

Legislative Matters March 29, 2021

LEGISLATIVE MATTERS: Tune In and Take Part

March 29, 2021

Unfortunately, another case of COVID was identified at the capitol, so House floor sessions will be impacted. The House were meeting in floor session Mondays and Tuesdays, with the Senate meeting Wednesdays and Thursdays. But, the House will not meet March 29 and sessions the rest of the week are up-in-the-air. Because floor sessions are in person meetings, there is an effort to have few people at the capitol, thus the different days for sessions. More bills are advancing through the first chamber hearings and floor votes and passing on to the second chamber for consideration. So far, the HOUSE has passed 25 Bills and the SENATE has passed 58 Bills. Cancelling floor session definitely slows the pace of the legislating. Earlier estimates of between 3000 and 4000 bills being introduced appear to be overly aggressive.

It’s been a very slow-moving session so far due to virtual committee hearings taking more time, walkouts by republicans, House Floor Sessions cancelled last week due to COVID, and minority republicans requiring reading the full text of all bills prior to voting on the floor. This is a tactic used by both parties when in the minority because it is effective for slowing the pace of the legislation. There is no good reason to read the bills in full when they are readily available to legislators and the public in advance of consideration. When slowing the pace doesn’t serve the minority well, we may see more walk-outs to prevent a quorum which then prevents voting on the floor. A super-majority does not give the majority super-powers. The Statesman Journal reported a story about the Republicans looking for a deal offering to speed up the session by not requiring reading of the bills if Democrats agree to only take-up COVID and Disaster Relief bills this session. This deal was offered by people who refuse to support a mandate to wear masks to prevent COVID, contrary to public health guidance, and walked out of the 2020 legislative session, making a Short Session even shorter, leaving several important bills related to wildfire prevention and better forestry management practices on the floor without action due to the walkout. We hope voters are paying attention.

Last week, the nation saw 2 more mass shootings, one in Boulder, Colorado and another on the outskirts of Atlanta, Georgia. Senate Bill 554 was passed by the Oregon Senate on March 25 in a party-line vote. This bill, which calls for allowing local officials the ability to bar guns in public places, such as schools, the capitol, public libraries, and other government offices, seems like a reasonable safeguard for the public. The effort by Republicans to scuttle this bill is evident in the record. Senators Deb Patterson (Salem) and Jeff Golden (Ashland) submitted explanations for their votes in support of the bill. We encourage you to read both explanations given the perceived controversy around this bill. Please go to https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/SB554 for complete information on this bill, including information on the votes of legislators.

The Senate Finance and Revenue Committee met on March 22 and received a report about the federal American Rescue Plan 2021 and what it means for Oregon. Go to: https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Committees/SFR/2021-03-22-13-45/MeetingMaterials to see a summary report of the expected financial impacts to Oregon’s revenue .

In the House, as of Sunday, there were 41 Third Readings of House Bills scheduled for a vote (now rescheduled due to closure of the House floor). These were carried over from March 24.

The House Rules, Health and Veterans and Emergency Management Committees were busy moving bills through the House. Of particular interest is how legislation will impact Salem’s Homeless Navigation Center. Given the political divide we are witnessing in the Oregon Legislature, the proposals by Idaho and several Oregon counties to move the Oregon-Idaho border move between Idaho and Oregon.

The House Committee on Health Care continues to push out dozens of bills covering a wide variety of subjects. Click on the links to bills provided below:

One of its bills is HB 5042 is very important to Salem residents.

The Joint Committee on Ways and Means has voted to advance HB 5042 to the House floor for a vote, a bill that allocates $18 million in critical funding to local governments that have taken on efforts to address housing insecurity issues, including a low-barrier, homeless navigation center for our community.

These resources are vital for so many Oregonians who face housing insecurity and are exposed to the elements year-round. Senator Deb Patterson, Democrat from Salem and chairperson of the House Committee on Health Care championed this bill.

This bill includes, among other funds:
$5 million for the Navigation Center in Salem
$2.9 million for the Oregon Foodbank
$1.1 million in aid to Marion County, the City of Detroit Gates and the City of Idanha.
$250 million in Summer Learning Programs

The general description or definition of a Navigation Center is a low-barrier, service-enriched shelter targeting high-needs homeless adults living in encampments. Onsite services include hygiene facilities, 24/7 staffing, and intensive case management. Usually, a Navigation Center can accommodate up to 85 guests at a time. Salem’s Navigation Center is still in the planning process and it is unclear how many the center will be able to accommodate.

This is an omnibus budget reconciliation bill implementing changes to rebalance the 2019-21 biennium legislatively approved budget. Meaning they have some extra money in the budget.

One of the most followed and most controversial bills from the House Committee on Health Care is HB2510.

This bill would require the owner or possessor of a firearm to secure it with a trigger or cable lock, in a locked container or in gun room except in specified circumstances.

Punishes violation by maximum of $500 fine. If minor obtains an unsecured firearm as a result of a violation, punishment could be a fine, maximum of $2,000. It provides that a person who does not secure the firearm as required is strictly liable for injury to person or property within two years after violation.

The bill also specifies exceptions to liability. It requires the owner or possessor of the firearm to secure it with trigger or cable lock or in locked container when transferring firearm under circumstances requiring criminal background check, except in specified circumstances. Punishes violation by maximum of $500 fine. The person who transfers the firearm without securing it is strictly liable for injury to person or property within two years after violation.

There are exceptions to liability. Person must report the loss or theft of a firearm within 72 hours of time person knew, or reasonably should have known, of the loss or theft. Punishes violation of requirement by maximum of $1,000 fine. The bill would require a person transferring a firearm to a minor to directly supervise minor’s use of firearm. It provides that the person who does not supervise the minor as required is strictly liable for injury to person or property caused by minor’s use of firearm. Authorizes person to transfer supervisory duty and liability to another person. There are exceptions to the supervision requirement and liability.

Directs Oregon Health Authority to specify by rule minimum specifications for trigger and cable locks and locked containers required by Act. Declares emergency, effective on passage.

The Oregon-Idaho Border is the subject of some discussion…

Idaho politics are a reverse of Oregon’s, which is why some Oregonians embrace the notion of shifting the state border. Idaho Republicans are the ones who hold supermajorities in their Legislature. They outnumber Democrats 28-7 in the Idaho Senate and 58-12 in the House. The split is so wide that the House and Senate committees that will hear Simmons’ testimony have a combined 20 R’s and five D’s. 

Backers of an expanded Idaho suggest, “Areas that vote like Idaho does, and are economically healthy enough to be welcomed by Idaho,” are eastern, southern and most of central Oregon, southeastern Washington and northeastern California.” 

It’s a longshot idea that would require congressional action, but five Oregon counties – Baker, Grant, Lake, Malheur and Sherman – have related measures on their May 18 ballot. Petition drives also are under way in Curry, Josephine, Jackson, Klamath, Harney, Morrow and Umatilla counties. Among the arguments being presented for the border charge are that “voters will appreciate Idaho’s overall lower taxes and red-state values on hot-button topics.”

One such topic is gun control, a defining issue of urban and rural America. 

Moving on to House Committee Meetings/Hearings this week:

Committee meetings for the week include:

House Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources

Tuesday, March 30, 2021 Second Reading

HB2033 The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) is the lead agency for supporting and responding to animal care and sheltering needs during an emergency, as articulated in the Oregon Statewide Emergency Operations Plan.

During emergencies, ODA can activate the Oregon Veterinary Emergency Response Team (OVERT), a volunteer cadre of veterinarians and technicians which can be mobilized to perform work on behalf of ODA. ODA can also deputize veterinarians, who then can perform work on behalf of ODA and the state.

The current law does not authorize ODA to deputize veterinarian technicians to support and assist the OVERT veterinarians and House Bill 2033 does.

House Committee On Business and Labor

March 31, 2021 Public Hearing

HB2698, Known as Oregon’s “Right to Repair” Bill.

WHAT THE MEASURE DOES: Requires original equipment manufacturer of consumer electronic equipment to make available on fair and reasonable terms any part, tool, embedded software, and documentation made available to authorized repair provider. Provides private right of action to person who suffers loss of money or property as a result of original equipment manufacturer’s failure to comply with provisions of the Act. Allows person to recover the actual damages or statutory damages of $1,000, whichever is greater, along with attorney fees and court costs. Allows class action. Defines terminology. Applies to originated equipment sold or in use on or after the effective date. Takes effect 91st day following adjournment sine die.

ISSUES DISCUSSED: When certain home electronics are not functioning properly, the consumer may face the choice of replacing the product or paying for the repair services of a business authorized by the original manufacturer to make the repair. Attempting to repair the product at home or through a service not authorized by the original manufacturer may void the warranty, and the tools and instructions necessary to make the repair may not be available.

House Committee on Health Care

Tuesday, March 30, 2021 3:15 p.m. Public Hearing, Thursday, April 1, 3:15 p.m., Work Session.

HB2376 Requires health care provider who prescribes opioid to offer prescription for naloxone, or similar drug, and educational material under specified circumstances. Defines “health care provider.” Allows health professional regulatory board to impose discipline for violation. Becomes operative on January 1, 2022. Takes effect on 91st day following adjournment sine die.

HOUSE COMMITTEE ON Economic Recovery and Prosperity

Tuesday, April 6, 8 a.m. hearing

NOTE: I mention this bill because Salem Cinema owner, Loretta Miles, testified at a March 25 hearing in support of this bill. A work session is now scheduled for April 6.

HB3376 Requires the Oregon Business Development Department (OBDD) to develop and implement a grant program for commercial indoor movie theaters. Limits eligibility to movie theaters closed to the general public for any period on or after March 13, 2020, as a result of restrictions related to the Covid-19 pandemic. Specifies amount of grant as $50,000 per movie theater, plus $10,000 for each screen over two screens in the theater. Limits number of grants that may be awarded to one per movie theater. Appropriates $8,700,000 to OBDD to carry out the program. Declares emergency, effective on July 1, 2021.

And, in the Senate: (Bold text generally indicates bills discussed in the program. Links to committees and bills provided below.)

 

Senate Committee On Education

3/29/2021 3:15 PM, Remote B

Public Hearing

  • SB 1 Permits merger of community college and public university.

A controversial bill introduced by Salem Senator and President of the Senate, Peter Courtney. Read the testimony regarding this bill and carefully consider what the consequences, both positive and negative which may result from this bill. This bill, if passed, will have important implications for students, educators, administrators and the public at large.

Work Session

  • SB 235 Directs Department of Corrections to develop plan for providing equipment, connectivity and infrastructure necessary to ensure that adults in custody have online access to certain education programs.

Submitted testimony suggests overwhelming support. Many recognize the importance of providing incarcerated people with education and training. Most people in prison will be released. It is important to provide education and training in skills useful when reentering society, however, there are concerns expressed by Department of Corrections (DOC) with proposed amendments suggested in their testimony:

Requested Action:

The Department of Corrections fully supports providing access to online education opportunities for men and women in custody, but currently lacks the resources or the funding needed to make it a reality now or by the bill’s deadline.

DOC respectfully requests amendments to:

  • Extend the final plan submittal deadline from August 1, 2021, to December 31, 2021;

  • Extend the implementation deadline from September 1, 2022, to January 2, 2023; and

  • Eliminate the requirement for HECC approval of the online education programs inasmuch as 1) DOC contracts with partner agencies, including HECC, to ensure education programs meet HECC requirements; 2) post-secondary programs provided by partner educators meet recognized standards for college credit, licensing, etc.; and 3) correspondence courses are already required to be approved in accordance with OAR 291-113. DOC proposes the HECC approval requirement be replaced with: “. . . or the program earns one of the following: college credit, college degree, college certification, industry- recognized certification or license, or an apprenticeship.”

  • SB 234 Directs Department of Corrections to consider certain education programs as qualifying programs for purposes of monetary performance reward system offered to adults in custody.

  • SB 782 Directs Department of Education to establish and administer pilot program that enables school districts to deliver mental health screenings to students in grades 9 through 12.

  • SB 404 Instructs Oregon State University Extension Service to establish certain new positions related to organic production and maintain certain existing position related to organic production.

404-2 appears to have strong support from the organic community as you might expect. The bill speaks to technical support to farmers transitioning to organic from conventional ag, requires DOA to hire 2 positions, Soil Health and Organic Marketing; and provides that organic products be approved for WIC public assistance program.

  • SB 702 Establishes Task Force on Social Studies Standards ( -1 Amendment).

WHAT THE MEASURE DOES:

Establishes Task Force on Social Studies Standards. Prescribes membership of Task Force. Requires Task Force to review social studies standards and civics education. Establishes reporting requirements.

ISSUES DISCUSSED:

  Social studies courses offered to students

  Limitations and gaps in material covered

  Importance of teaching social studies and civics

EFFECT OF AMENDMENT:

-1 Replaces measure. Requires State Board of Education to review social studies standards by December 31, 2025. Establishes consultation requirements and considerations.

BACKGROUND:

Currently, Oregon’s content standards for K-12 schools are reviewed on a rotating basis by the State Board of Education. Senate Bill 702 establishes a Task Force to review the social studies content standards.

We spoke about HB 2299 (Rep. Evans) previously which calls for civics education required for graduation.

The League of Women Voters provided comprehensive testimony on 702 and other education related bills. Following is an excerpt:

“We believe that SB 683 and SB 702 address curriculum items already largely in place, as ODE has comprehensive Social Sciences Standards that are routinely updated, including K-12 civics education. In 2017, Oregon passed HB 2845, requiring the integration of ethnic studies into social science standards. The goal of these new standards is to better represent the history, contributions, and perspectives of traditionally underrepresented individuals and groups. The new 2021 draft document, 2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies, was released in January for comment and will go to the Oregon School Board for final approval later this year.

We urge this committee to ensure that SB 683 does not duplicate standards established in previous sessions, reflected in the 2021 Social Science Standards: Ethnic Studies (2017, HB 2845/ HB 2023), Holocaust & Genocide (2019, SB 664), Tribal History/Shared History 2017, SB 13). We would also like clarification on whether SB 702 duplicates or replaces the work of an existing task force. SB 702 states The task force shall: review the social studies standards for kindergarten through grade 12, with an emphasis on civics education and making more accessible instruction related to: voting rights and how to vote; current and historical social movements; and the roles of local governments and tribal governments then make recommendations for any changes related to the social studies standards.However, an advisory group consisting of representatives from 13 ethnic and social groups convened from November 2017 to June 2019. The advisory group meetings culminated in the production of a recommendation of ethnic studies standards to be included as part of the social science K-12 standards. ODE also hosts a number of resources on the Social Science Webpage, including a list of supplemental resources and helpful websites. We believe that SB 702 intent may already be in the 2021 Social Science Standards. However, if yet another task force is formed, the League of Women Voters would be happy to serve as the Governor’s appointed “voting rights advocate” in the process.”

3/31/2021 3:15 PM, Remote B

Work Session

  • SB 580 Amends definition of “employment relations” to include class size and caseload limits as mandatory collective bargaining subjects for school districts.

  • SB 129 Increases maximum allowed fee Teacher Standards and Practices Commission can impose for reinstatement of license that has been suspended or revoked for gross neglect of duty or gross unfitness.

  • SB 744 Directs Department of Education to review state requirements for high school diploma and to report results of review to interim committees of Legislative Assembly related to education and to State Board of Education

 

Senate Committee On Energy and Environment

4/1/2021 1:00 PM, Remote B

Work Session

  • SB 289 Directs office of Governor, in consultation with Racial Justice Council’s Environmental Equity Committee, to study laws related to environment and provide results to interim committees of Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.

  • SB 570 Establishes product stewardship program for mattresses.

  • SB 784 Authorizes public utility to seek rate recovery for operating expenses and capital costs associated with resiliency measures.

PGE is the initiator of this bill introduced by Senator Beyer who has long experience with energy. Although the bill has support in spirit as do man

Excerpt from Testimony from Oregon Solar + Storage Industry Association

In conclusion, while OSSIA strongly supports the ability of communities to choose clean energy and invest in clean energy resiliency, we oppose SB 784 as written as the way to get there. We look forward to engaging this committee in finding a better path forward.”

  • SB 803 Prohibits scrap metal business from purchasing or receiving catalytic converters, except from commercial seller.

Excerpts from Testimony on SB804:

Dear Chair Baker and Members of the Committee:

The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) is a national, century-old, not-for-profit organization supported by approximately 1,200 property and casualty insurance companies, including many who write business in Oregon. Working hand-in-hand with our member companies and law enforcement, we investigate organized criminal conspiracies dealing with insurance and vehicle crime.

Catalytic converter theft is on a sharp rise, in part due to the rise in prices associated with precious metals, including rhodium, platinum, and palladium which are used in the construction of catalytic converters as these metals act as catalysts, removing toxic elements from the exhaust stream. The relative easy and speed in which a thief can remove a catalytic converter, coupled with the financial reward a thief can reap selling the scrap metal is what drives thefts.

Installing a replacement catalytic converter can cost individual Oregonians hundreds to thousands of dollars, and because thieves try to remove the converters as quickly as possible, their hastiness often causes repair costs to be higher due to other areas of the car being damaged.”

And…

On behalf of the Oregon State Sheriff’s Association (OSSA) and the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police OACP), thank you for the opportunity to provide testimony in support of SB 803 which seeks to address the growing number of catalytic converter thefts throughout Oregon.

OSSA and OACP members have seen a troubling rise in catalytic converter thefts, particularly in the metro areas of the state. We believe this measure will reduce the level of theft and will provide an improved ability to investigate and apprehend individuals responsible for the theft of catalytical converters when they occur. In past sessions, OSSA and OACP supported similar measures that required persons pawning an item to provide identification at the time the item is being purchased by a pawn/loan company. These types of preventative steps have helped to reduce stolen items from being sold to pawn/loan companies and provide law enforcement with needed information from pawn/loan companies when they discover they are in possession of a stolen item.

OSSA and OACP support SB 803 which would limit the sale of catalytic converters to registered businesses. It provides that any person selling a catalytic converter must provide a business address, present ID, and provide the driver’s license and vehicle identification number (VIN) of the vehicle from which the catalytic converter was taken. This will create a law enforcement traceable record that will make it easier to find and apprehend those who engage in catalytic converter theft, drying up the secondary market in catalytic converters for all but legitimate business sellers.”

Judiciary and Ballot Measure 110 Implementation

3/29/2021 8:00 AM, Remote A

  • Public Hearing

    • SB 753 Repeals requirement that Division of Child Support provide certain spousal support enforcement services for obligees who receive public assistance but who are not also receiving child support enforcement services.

    • SB 812 Directs Department of Justice to study and make recommendations on provisions of state law related to child support.

    • SB 821 Creates process to rebut presumption of inability to pay support order after support order is suspended and procedure upon reinstatement following rebuttal of presumption.

    • SB 822 Consolidates unpaid child support accruing under superseded child support order into amounts payable under later-issued court order.

    • SB 835 Modifies procedures for early medical release of adult in custody from prison.

    • SB 836 Directs Department of Corrections to consider all other alternatives before suspending, terminating or taking other specified action concerning alternative incarceration program.

  • Work Session

    • SB 201 Provides that person commits offense of driving while under influence of intoxicants if person has blood alcohol level of 0.08 percent or more by weight within two hours after driving vehicle.

    • SB 499 Creates civil claim for wrongful conviction.

Excerpt from testimony by Steven Wax, Oregon Innocence Project on Senate Bill 499-1which would Establish an Oregon Exoneree Compensation Law

As eloquently detailed by the exonerees testifying on SB 499, the excitement of finally being free can come with the overwhelming weight of trying to piece life back together. It is no surprise that wrongfully incarcerated individuals who spent years behind bars struggle when they re-enter the community. Compensation and services will help exonerees rebuild their lives, while also sending the message that the state is taking responsibility for a mistake that resulted in the exoneree losing years of their freedom.

The proposed process in SB 499-1 involves an exoneree petitioning the court for compensation. This is a common practice that occurs in the majority of states with compensation laws. 21 of the 35 states with compensation laws use the court process. The states that do not use the court process have encountered numerous issues. For example:

  • California established a board to consider compensation claims. Even though the board appeared favorable to exonerees, it rejected most claims for compensation. The board was so ineffective that California passed a law to create an alternative court process. Additionally, the board is comprised of political appointees, which results in an unnecessarily political process.

  • Maryland’s compensation claims go through the Board of Public Works. Five exonerees filed claims. Several waited over 2 years before the Board responded. The Board only responded and paid the claims after the media covered the issue.

  • Connecticut’s system requires claims to go through a State Claims Commissioner. Claims are indefinitely on hold because the new State Claims Commissioner will not proceed with processing the claims.

While SB 499-1 establishes a straightforward process for Oregon’s innocent to obtain compensation, we strongly believe that 1(1)(b) needs to be amended to read, “The person’s conviction was reversed or vacated and either the charges were dismissed or on retrial the person was found not guilty, or the person received a grant of pardon on the grounds of innocence.” A determination of innocence by the governor should be given equal weight to a determination by the courts.

Oregon is one of only 15 (soon to be 14) states that does not provide compensation to wrongfully convicted individuals. In recent weeks, the Idaho Legislature unanimously approved their own compensation legislation and the Governor will sign that bill into law soon. It is time for Oregon to join the majority and compensate wrongfully convicted Oregonians for the years of freedom that were stripped away from them by the state.”

    • SB 177 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 3/25/21 AGENDA: Establishes exception to prohibition against hearsay evidence, regardless of availability of witness, for certain statements offered against party who engaged in conduct preventing declarant from testifying or causing declarant to refuse to appear or testify.

    • SB 116 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 3/25/21 AGENDA: Provides that it is unlawful for private security provider or entity that employs private security providers to possess or use equipment, vehicles, uniforms or titles that imply affiliation with public or private safety agency.

    • SB 209 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 3/25/21 AGENDA: Allows owner of interest held in financial institution or holder of traveler’s check or money order to demonstrate lack of abandonment by electronic communication or other records by institution or issuer.

    • SB 565 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 3/25/21 AGENDA: Modifies definition of “slayer” to include individuals who are found responsible or guilty except for insanity of taking person’s life.

    • SB 768 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 3/25/21 AGENDA: Modifies provisions relating to attorneys.

    • SB 829 CARRIED OVER FROM THE 3/25/21 AGENDA: Clarifies rights of possession of real property following execution sales.

For more information on committee meetings/hearings and a whole lot more, please go to KMUZ.org. Click on “Learn Why Legislative Matters” for more resources.

Join us every Monday at 8:00 am for Willamette Wake-Up and another edition of Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part, or listen to the podcasts of this program and other Willamette Wake-Up great programs available at KMUZ.org. Thanks again for Tuning In and Taking Part.

 


Legislative Matters April 12, 2021

Legislative Matters April 12, 2021

LEGISLATIVE MATTERS: Tune In and Take Part

April 12, 2021

We are half-way through the session and things are about to heat up as deadlines come and go and bills die in committee or are voted down in a floor vote. Legislative bills are working their way through the legislature, with more and more floor votes sending measures on to the second chamber for consideration. Further culling of bills happens this week. Any bill not considered in a Work Session in the first chamber by April 13 is practically dead. We know bills can be brought back to life through some procedural or committee action in Rules, Ways and Means, and Judiciary, but due to the slow pace in the first half of the session, many bills will not move forward.

Approximately 300 bills have made it through the first chamber. LegiScan.com provides a great summary of bills and where they are in the process. Click on https://legiscan.com/OR/legislation?status=engrossed to see bills which have passed one chamber and are headed to the second chamber. Now’s the time communicate with your legislators in the second chamber on the bills of interest to you. A simple email to your legislator indicating your support/opposition to a bill and a brief explanation of why is enough to make some impact.

Currently, full page ads in the Statesman/Journal and the Oregonian from PhRMA, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association, asks readers to tell politicians to “stop threatening access to innovative treatments and vaccines” and oppose SB 844.

The bill establishes Prescription Drug Affordability Board in Department of Consumer and Business Services to review prices for prescription drug products meeting specified cost criteria. It further requires the board to establish upper payment limits for drugs that are or are expected to create affordability challenges for health systems and patients in Oregon or health inequities for communities of color. It also requires the board to establish and assess fees against manufacturers of prescription drug products sold in Oregon for costs of carrying out duties of board. Establishes Prescription Drug Affordability Stakeholder Council to assist board in carrying out its duties.

PhRMA wants you to learn more about their side of issue at ProtectOregonCures.com. But, for a better understanding of both sides, click on the bill number above to read an Overview of the bill. Once on the landing page, click on the Text tab to see the full text of the bill and the Testimony tab to see what supporters and opponents have to say.

Another ad in the Oregonian, paid for by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, speaks directly to the Chair of the House Committee on Human Services, Representative Anna Williams, Democrat, District 52, Hood River. The ad wants Williams to bring HB2348 to a vote. The ad goes on to say Oregonians want healthful plant-based options in hospitals, long-term care facilities and prisons.

Opposing the bill are Oregon’s community hospitals and the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems.

Senate Concurrent Resolution 17 and HB 2488 are bills embracing environmental justice and adapting land-use goals to the urgent needs of climate change. They both establish environmental justice framework of principles for the State of Oregon. Opinion pieces ran in the Statesman Journal in support of these measures.

Two Senators Dallas Heard, Republican, District 1, Roseburg and Brian Boquist, Independent, District 12, Dallas, will both vote no on these two bills. Heard because he believes that the “People’s Work” should be considered an essential service and there for accessible in person. Because the people are still being denied their constitutional right to participate and lobby their legislature in an open manner (i.e. be allowed into the Capitol), He said, “I cannot legitimize this session with a yes vote no matter the merit of the bill, and therefore had to vote no”.

And, Senator Boquist (Dallas)because he says since the resolution does nothing I will not be a party to the conspiracy. I want a proposal to pass changes to the law instead of legislating press releases.”

In other action, Oregon Speaker of the House Tina Kotek and Senate President Peter Courtney each sent all members in their respective chambers a two-question survey asking how they would like to spend money in connection with Oregon’s share of cash from the American Rescue Plan Act, or ARPA, signed into law last month by President Joe Biden.

Oregon’s expected share is $2.6` billion. Legislative budget writers say they will need $1.3 billion to fund existing programs and services and need a set aside of $520 million in a reserve fund for future budget cycles.

That leaves $780 million unallocated. Sounds like Christmas may come early this year.

Last Friday, April 9, in a unanimous ruling, the Oregon Supreme Court gave the legislature until Sept. 27 or almost three extra months, to complete redistricting. The Oregon constitution mandates that the Legislature must complete the task of redistricting by July 1. Due to the U.S. Census Bureau’s tardiness in supplying data from the US Census, the Legislature could not meet the deadline. Due to that same delay, the SOS could not meet her back-up mandate of picking up the unfinished project and completing it by mid-August. The Legislature wanted an extension and the SOS wanted to use current data to complete the project in August so the spring 2022 election dates would not have to be changed.

The Supreme Court gave them both a victory. The Legislature got an extension, but the extension will not require a change in the 2022 election dates.

Lovers of going to the cinema to see a movie are still watching HB3376 closely. If passed, it could potentially provide grants of $50,000 to movie theaters with 2 or fewer screens, with an additional $10,000 per screen above that count. The bill is still alive and came out of a work session and headed to the Joint Ways and Means committee due to its funding requirements.

Senate Bill 5, which would allow college athletes in Oregon to earn compensation for use of their name, image and likeness (called NIL), and to retain representation related to those opportunities is still alive.

Athletic directors from each of Oregon’s four Division 1 universities are in favor of college athletes in the state being able to benefit from their NIL but have asked state lawmakers not to pass the latest proposed legislation on the matter and asked them to wait for Congress to enact national legislation on what’s commonly known as NIL.

Check out upcoming hearings in both the Senate and House here.

For more information on committee meetings/hearings and a whole lot more, please go to KMUZ.org. Click on “Learn Why Legislative Matters” for more resources.

Join us every Monday at 8:00 am for Willamette Wake-Up and another edition of Legislative Matters: Tune In and Take Part, or listen to the podcasts of this program and other great Willamette Wake-Up programs available at KMUZ.org. Thanks again for Tuning In and Taking Part.